Alex Morgan helped the U.S. set five WWC records in its opener.  (Michael Chow-USA TODAY Sports)

The United States set quite a few Women’s World Cup records in its 13-0 victory over Thailand.

* The 13 goals were the most scored by any team in a WWC match and the 10 in the second half were the most scored in a half. The previous record was set by Germany in 2007 with an 11-0 win over Argentina. The 13 goals were one less than the U.S. record (in any game) of 14, which was achieved in a 14-0 victory over the Dominican Republic in an Olympic qualifying match in 2012.

* Alex Morgan’s three assists to go along with her five goals were the most combined goals and assists a player has had in a World Cup game.

* Morgan is the fourth player in WWC history with three or more goals and at least one assist in a match.

* The USA is the first WWC team to get goals from seven different players in a game: Alex Morgan (5), Sam Mewis (2), Rose Lavelle (2), Lindsey Horan, Mallory Pugh, Megan Rapinoe and Carli Lloyd.

* There were just six minutes between the USA’s fourth and seventh goals (50′, 53′, 54′, 56′), the fastest four goals that have ever been scored in a single Women’s World Cup match in the competition’s history. Later in the game, the USA scored four goals in just over eight minutes.

* Morgan’s five goals tied Michelle Akers’ WWC record for most goals in a single game. Akers made history in the USA’s 7-0 victory over Chinese Taipei in the 1991 quarterfinals, which was the record for biggest win in a World Cup for the USA.

* Lloyd tied Birgit Prinz’s record set in 2007, when her goal in stoppage time gave her goals in five consecutive WWC matches. At the 2015 World Cup in Canada, she scored in all four games of the knockout round.

* The USA is the first Women’s WWC to have three players record multiple goals in a game game: Morgan (5), Mewis (2) and Lavelle (2).

* The USA has had 32 players (excluding own goals) score at the WWC, making it the second nation to have that many different scorers in the competition’s history after Germany (34).